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Lessons from the bankruptcy of PharmaTrust

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Comments

Robert:

Excellent article, I was too disappointed to hear the news. As for the cost of the device, not only did they offer convenince, but also security and accountability, they provided extra steps toward reducing prescription fraud, by recording the transaction. I wish they could have gotten over whatever barrier they had to face, it would have improved many aspects of pharmaceutical distribution with respect to both availability and security.

Wednesday, July 18 at 9:07 am | Reply

Henry:

What happened to this company? I understand it went bankrupt, but who bought it? Is the technology still available for purchase? Is someone trying to fix these issues and start over? Any comparison to InstyMeds in the US? Thank you!

Wednesday, August 08 at 9:29 pm

John:

it is still an excellent and viable solution and demonstrates the corruptness in healthcare and how governing bodies have so much influence in ensuring poor patient care. Who currently owns the patents if any? Do the share holders have these rights?

Wednesday, December 18 at 6:21 pm

Joe:

They got what they deserved…failure in management…management had no vision….

Wednesday, August 08 at 11:00 pm | Reply

Michel Gregoire:

I could not agree more with the content of your article.
I work for a start-up company that has developped and is distributing an electronic weekly bister-pack.
This device is programmed by the pharmacist, guides the patient with visual and sound effects in order that they follow doctor’s precription.
But more than that, it can send alerts to caregiver or health professionnal, in case of missed or not in time doses.
In doing so it helps patients being more compliant and thus avoid hospitalization or getting back to work quicker.
I have been presenting to insurers, but they stay in the side lines not seing the benefit of mid or long term economic savings.
Pharmacists, like you stated, are hesitant because they more likely look at the cost of the service instead of the service to patient benefit.
We are looking at going south of the border to test the american market.
Do you have any comments or suggestions ?

Michel Gregoire
projectquebec@yahoo.ca

Monday, August 27 at 9:34 am | Reply

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