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Keyword: Low volatility

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While factor behaviour tends to be consistent in market crashes and corrections, individual factor performance varies over the medium term. As such, institutional investors should maintain diversified exposure across key equity factors including value, quality, momentum, size and low volatility, according to a new paper by Mercer. The paper explored the past three financial crises: […]

  • By: Staff
  • July 31, 2020 December 6, 2020
  • 07:56
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Investors seeking regular income are limited because traditional sources aren’t producing the results they used, says Dave Makarchuk, partner and Western Canada wealth business leader at Mercer, noting bond yields are really low and coupons are low. “And so dividends can be an attractive option for those who are seeking regular cash flow,” he says. […]

Case Study: Taming Volatility, Step-by-Step

How WCB Alberta restructured its portfolio in uncertain times.

The Good and Bad News About Factor ETFs

Turns out there’s a bigger issue than crowded trades

  • May 31, 2017 September 13, 2019
  • 08:57
It’s True: A Long-term Focus Pays Off

McKinsey’s new index puts data behind the argument for long-term management.

  • February 8, 2017 September 13, 2019
  • 15:06
Sinclair: Investment Risk Reduction Strategies

NBIMC head talks asset allocation and funding ratios

Does Low Volatility Investing Work?

How high-volatility realities are driving the low vol trend

  • By: Staff
  • February 24, 2016 September 13, 2019
  • 07:02
Video: Low-volatility equity strategies for DC plans

Investing in stocks has historically provided the potential growth investors need when accumulating assets as they prepare for retirement. In times of market volatility, however, an account’s drop in value can result in investors selling stocks at near-low levels and then buying them back at higher ones when markets recover.

Low Volatility Strategies: The Historical Performance

A review of the return-volatility relationship.

Look to low-volatility for long-term returns

Instead of worrying about short-term noise in the market, investors should focus on long-term outcomes, says Sandy McIntyre, vice-chairman of Sentry Investments.